Weekly Declaration and Projection for Sept. 18, 2013

The weekly declaration and 10-week projection for the Savannah River reservoirs are included below.

Outflows at the Hartwell Dam are expected to rise to a daily average 6,370 cubic feet per second (csf) starting Monday Sept. 23. Lake Hartwell elevation is currently 660.3 feet above mean sea level (f-msl).

At the Thurmond Dam, the daily average outflow rate will decrease slightly to 8,215 cfs starting Saturday Sept. 21. Thurmond Lake elevation is currently 330.1 f-msl.

The Russell Dam will transition down to an outflow rate of 4,540 cfs starting Monday Sept. 23.

As always, the declaration is subject to adjustment if we receive high volumes of unexpected rainfall. If adjustments are made, we will post them in the comments section below.

Click here to view declaration 09/11/2013 (If you can’t view the PDF when you click the link, try refreshing your browser on the new window)

Click here to view 10-week projection 09/11/2013

We welcome your comments, questions and feedback in the comments section below. Thanks for reading us!

About US Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District oversees a multi-million dollar military construction program at 11 Army and Air Force installations in Georgia and North Carolina. We also manage water resources across the Coastal Georgia region, including maintenance dredging of the Savannah and Brunswick harbors; operation of three hydroelectric dams and reservoirs along the upper Savannah River; and administration of an extensive stream and wetland permitting and mitigation program within the state of Georgia. Follow us on Twitter @SavannahCorps and on Facebook.com/SavannahCorps
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  • jimmy

    Looking at the 10 week projection, it would appear you are going to ignore everyone’s plea to only drop the lakes 2 feet. Outflows from Thurmond are staying above 8000cfs thru that period so I guess you are shooting for 4 feet down at some point. Since we just had one of the wettest August on record with the lakes full and no serious problems occurred, one would think we could learn from that. I’ll make one last plea. Save the precious water we have as long as you can so that when the next drought occurs, everyone will benefit with the extra 2 foot head start.